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The Temple of Concord and Victory

Stowe: The Grecian Valley



Michael Bevington gives an extensive description to this important garden building in his book, and he suggests texts for further reading that go into even greater detail about the statuary and the medallions that have adorned the Temple.

The Temple of Concord and Victory
The Temple of Concord and Victory from the northeast

Originally known as the Grecian Temple, begun in 1747, the Temple of Concord and Victory was renamed at the end of the Seven Years' War (1756-1763) to celebrate British peace at home and victory in the field. During the early years of the 1760s, the relief of the four corners of the earth bringing tribute to Britannia that had once adorned the eastern wall of the Palladian Bridge (see the photograph below) was installed in the pediment of the Temple, medallions celebrating military vistories were added to the interior, and statues were added to the roof. Copies of three of those statues appear below: Victory in the center, which stands on the eastern apex, and the Liberal Arts of Painting and Sculpture, which stand on the western end (see the photographs below).

Detail of the pediment of The Temple of Concord and Victory
Detail of the portico pediment
of The Temple of Concord and Victory

The Liberal Art of Painting
The Liberal Art of Painting
Concord and Victory
Victory
The Liberal Art of Sculpture
The Liberal Art of Sculpture

Below you will find two panoramas -- the top one being an interior view and the bottom one being a view from the steps of the Temple out over the Grecian Valley.

Each panorama will automatically spin in a clockwise direction, but you may control its movement by placing your cursor on the image and using your left mouse button to drag the image in whatever direction you wish.



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John D. Tatter, Birmingham-Southern College, jtatter@bsc.edu