WEBSITES EVERY MEDIEVALIST SHOULD KNOW

 

 

<http://www.georgetown.edu/labyrinth/labyrinth-home.html>

The Labyrinth: Resources for Medieval Studies

The Labyrinth provides free, organized access to electronic resources in medieval studies through a World Wide Web server at Georgetown University. The Labyrinth's easy-to-use menus and links provide connections to databases, services, texts, and images on other servers around the world. Each user will be able to find an Ariadne's thread through the maze of information on the Web. This project not only provides an organizational structure for electronic resources in medieval studies, but also serves as a model for similar, collaborative projects in other fields of study.


<http://orb.rhodes.edu>

The Online Resource Book for Medieval Studies

ORB is a cooperative effort on the part of scholars across the internet to establish an online textbook source for medieval studies on the World-Wide Web. It attempts to do for teaching what Labyrinth does for research. Contents include original articles, texts for classroom use, bibliographies, maps, photographs, syllabi, and other materials useful in a classroom setting. All articles have been judged by at least two peer reviewers. Authors are held to high standards of accuracy, currency, and relevance to the field of medieval studies.


<http://www.salve.edu/~dimaiom/deimprom.html>

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

This web site is an online encyclopedia of the rulers of Rome. In the Latin West, rulers were known as Imperator and Augustus, and in the Greek East they were known as Basileus, Augustus. This site allow its users to retrieve short biographical essays of all the Roman emperors from the accession of the Emperor Augustus to the death of the Emperor Constantine XI Palaeologus. Each essay on this site, which is peer reviewed, is written by a scholar and is accompanied by a bibliography, illustrations, and footnotes.


<http://www.salve.edu/~romanemp/atlas/index.htm>

The DIR and ORB Antique and Medieval Atlas

The maps in this Antique and Medieval Atlas show the political status of Europe, Africa, and Asia at the beginning of each century from the First Century to the Tenth Century. If your web-connection is fast, you may choose to view the full-sized maps. If not, you can click on those parts of the maps which you want to enlarge.


<http://www.clues.abdn.ac.uk:8080/besttest/firstpag.html>

The Aberdeen Bestiary

A pilot scheme for producing digitised images of manuscripts on the World Wide Web. The site contains the entire bestiary (50-60 pages), with images of each page, a transcription of the text, and a translation of the text. Images are unusually clear.


<http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/sbook.html>

Online Medieval Sourcebook

The Sourcebook is organized as three main index pages, with a number of supplementary documents. Each individual section is still large - an organizational goal here is to avoid incessant "clicking" to get between pages and to information.

Selected Sources: This is an index of selected and excerpted texts for teaching purposes. For teachers who wish to refer students to the Sourcebook, this page is the best starting point. Full Text Sources: Full texts of medieval sources arranged according to type. Saints' Lives: Devoted to Ancient, Medieval and Byzantine hagiographical
sources.



<http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/rawl/>

The Rawlinson Center

This site fosters teaching and research in the history and culture of Anglo-Saxon England and in the broader field of manuscript studies. Dedicated to the memory of the founder of the chair of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford University, and established through a gift from Georgian Rawlinson Tashjian and David Reitler Tashjian, the Center opened in May 1994. Its resources are currently being actively developed. It houses a small but growing specialist library of books, microfiches, microfilms, and slides. Eventually it will hold photographic reproductions in various formats of a large number of Anglo-Saxon and other manuscripts, with back-up reference materials. The Center maintains vigorous links with projects exploring the digital imaging of manuscripts, notably the Electronic Beowulf Project, whose other bases are the British Library and the University of Kentucky, and seeks to develop further the potential of digitization for teaching and research.


<http://humanities.uchicago.edu/images/heures/heures.html>

LES TRES RICHES HEURES DU DUC DE BERRY

The pictures in this directory are from the calendar section of the Tres Riches Heures. This was painted some time between 1412 and 1416 and is arguably the most beautiful part of the manuscript; it is certainly the best known, being one of the great art treasures of France. In terms of historical and cultural importance, it is certainly equal to more famous works such as the Mona Lisa, marking the pinnacle of the art of manuscript illumination.


<http://cedar.evansville.edu/~ecoleweb/>

The Ecole Initiative: Hypertext Encyclopedia of Early Church History:

The title of this site may be somewhat misleading, in that it considers the "early church" to include the Middle Ages. It contains linked documents, glossary, articles, images and chronological charts.


<http://www.arch.columbia.edu/DDL/projects/amiens/>

Amiens Cathedral. A Multimedia Project for the Columbia University Core Curriculum

The Digital Design Lab is participating in "Amiens Cathedral -- A Multimedia Project for the Core Curriculum" a NEH-supported project with Prof. Stephen Murray of Art History. This site is still under development, but images and diagrams are extremely useful for discussions of gothic architecture.


<http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/OMACL/>

The Online Medieval and Classical Library (OMACL)

This is a collection of some of the most important literary works of Classical and Medieval civilization. Entire texts may be downloaded.


<http://www.byu.edu/~hurlbut/dscriptorium/>

DScriptorium

This site is devoted to collecting, storing and distributing digital images of Medieval manuscripts (D is for Digital). All materials contained here may be freely distributed for the personal use of students, scholars and the public.


<http://www.princeton.edu/Main/Departments/dante.html>

The Dartmouth Dante Project

This site, founded in 1982, will eventually make available on line some 60 commentaries to Dante's DIVINA COMMEDIA composed in the last 670 years. The principal site of the project is Dartmouth College, which has had the collaboration, both financial and collegial, of Princeton University.


<http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/piers/archive.goals.html>

The Piers Plowman Electronic Archive

The long-range goal of the Piers Plowman Electronic Archive is the creation of a multi-level, hyper-textually linked electronic archive of the textual tradition of all three versions of the fourteenth-century allegorical dream vision Piers Plowman. Project editors will begin by making documentary editions of B manuscripts available in the first years, by preparing color digital facsimiles of those manuscripts, by reconstructing the B archetype (the latest common copy from which all extant witnesses can be shown to descend), and by establishing a critical edition of the B version with appropriate textual, linguistic, and codicological annotation for each of the three levels of the Archive. We will continue preparing documentary editions of the remaining B manuscripts and early printed texts and begin transcribing A and C manuscripts.


<http://matrix.divinity.yale.edu/MatrixWebData/matrix.html>

Matrix

A collection of resources for the study of women's religious communities, 500-1500, Matrix is an ongoing collaborative effort by an international group of scholars of medieval history, religion, history of art, archaeology, religion, and other disciplines, as well as librarians and experts in computer technology. Our goal is to document the participation of Christian women in the religion and society of medieval Europe. In particular, we aim to collect and make available all existing data about all professional Christian women in Europe between 500 and 1500 C.E. The project draws on both textual and material sources, primary and secondary, although its basis is unpublished archival evidence. It addresses a variety of individuals and groups in medieval Europe, and a range of ecclesiastical institutions, including monastic houses of every size, affiliation, and rule. Our editorial intentions in selecting and presenting material are both scholarly and pedagogical--Matrix is designed for use by scholars, students, and anyone interested in the study of women, medieval Europe, or the history of Christianity.


<http://www.lib.cam.ac.uk/deptserv/manuscripts/Ee.3.59/>

The Life of Edward the Confessor

Cambridge University library has recently made available online "the only copy of a thirteenth-century Anglo-Norman, illuminated Life of St. Edward the Confessor." The manuscript, written in the 1230s or 40s and executed in the 1250s or 60s, is well-preserved, and its new availability should be a boon for medievalists. Cambridge's site allows users to page through all 37 folios, beginning with the first, or to obtain descriptions of each folio and view them selectively. Users can zoom in on all or part of a page or view pages side-by-side. The site also includes a brief introduction to the manuscript and suggestions for further reading.


<http://rodent.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/robhome.htm>

The Rossell Hope Robbins Library at the University of Rochester

The Rossell Hope Robbins Library, a special collection of the Rush Rees Library at the University of Rochester, contains over 12,000 volumes on "all aspects of Middle English literature." The site is highlighted by four virtual collections: The Camelot Project; The Robin Hood Project; TEAMS (Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University) Middle English Texts; and Robbins Library Bibliographies. The first two collections contain texts, images, and bibliographies pertinent to their topics. The TEAMS collection contains, at present, over 100 full texts (each with an explanatory introduction), from "Above All Thing Thow Arte a Kyng" to The Book of Margery Kempe to Ywain and Gawain. There are also eight bibliographies at present, covering the Arthurian legends, Robin Hood, and general medieval literature. These collections, with their combination of primary and secondary source material, combine to make an excellent medieval studies resource.


<http://serinf.univ-montp3.fr/MEMED/>

Montpellier Early Modern English Documents (MEMED)

The Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur la Renaissance Anglaise in Montpellier is glad to announce the creation of a new e-text collection dedicated to early modern English documents. MEMED is a collection of electronic texts prepared for the online community of Renaissance scholars by the members and partners of the Centre d'Etudes et de Recherches sur la Renaissance Anglaise in Montpellier We intend to provide these documents in at least two formats, html and rtf. Only html is available at this time. You may use and redistribute these texts provided that the legal notices prefixed to them are not removed from the documents.


OTHER SITES THAT MAY ENHANCE YOUR CLASSES:

For ORB's links to Dante in art, try:
<http://orb.rhodes.edu/encyclop/culture/lit/Italian/da_i.htm>

"The Enchanted Gardens of the Renaissance" are at:
<http://sgwww.epfl.ch/BERGER/Jardin/index_english.html>

For an illustrated lecture on Sandro Botticelli, go to:
<http://sgwww.epfl.ch/BERGER/Sandro/1frontispice_english.html>

For Renaissance art and Mathematical Perspective, see
<http://www.pd.astro.it/ars/arshtml/renart1.html>

For art and artifacts of the Vatican Library,
<http://www.christusrex.org/www1/vaticano/0-Musei.html>

For Italian Renaissance artists, (including Giotto, Leonardo, Raphael, and Michelangelo): <http://sunsite.unc.edu/wm/paint/tl/it-ren/>

For Northern Renaissance artists (Durer, Bruegal, Holbein):
<http://sunsite.unc.edu/wm/paint/tl/north-ren/>

For the Uffizi Gallery at Florence, contact our reserved areas on:
<http://www.televisual.it/uffizi/ >

Your Username is: galleria96
Your Password is: uffizi96

 

The Drawings of Leponardo da Vinci are at:
<http://banzai.msi.umn.edu/~reudi/leonardo.html>

Explore the Ceiling of the Sistine Chapel at:
<http://www.science.wayne.edu/~mcogan/Humanities/Sistine/>

 

A FEW ARCHITECTURAL SITES:

For a massive collection of photographs of medieval architecture in France, see: <http://www1.pitt.edu/~medart/menufrance/mainfran.html>.
This site is still under construction, but is over half complete--certainly enough to satisfy our needs.

For the corresponding site on English architecture, see:
<http://www1.pitt.edu/~medart/menuengl/maineng.html>.
This site opens with a clickable map. Choosing your site from the map takes you to a separate page for each example, and provides floor plans and elevations, as well as photographs.

For a photographic essay on the elements of Romanesque architecture, try:
<http://www.tulane.edu/lester/text/Early.Christian.Period/Romanesque/Romanesquee.html>.

Early Gothic essay is at:
<http://www.tulane.edu/lester/text/Gothic/Early.Gothic/Early.Gothic.html>.

Late Gothic essay is at :
<http://www.tulane.edu/lester/text/Gothic/Late.Gothic/Late.Gothic.html>

An illustrated dictionary of terms used in Gothic architecture may be found at: <http://wwwcatsic.ucsc.edu/~arth147/terms.html>

 

MUSIC SOURCES:

Fourteenth Century:
<http://www.lib.latrobe.edu.au/music14.html>

For sound clips demonstrating Renaissance instruments, go to:
<http://www.hike.te.chiba-u.ac.jp:80/cons1/>

For the Vatican Library's music exhibit (from Gregorian chant to opera), go to:
<http://141.142.3.130/SDG/Experimental/vatican.exhibit/exhibit/e-music/Music.html>

 

BIBLE-RELATED WEBSITES:

 

http://www.cybercomm.net/~dcon/drbible.html
http://etext.virginia.edu/rsv.browse.html
http://www.catholic.net/
http://www.christusrex.org/
http://erdos.math.byu.edu/~smithw/Lds/LDS/Ancient-history-items/Bible/Vulgate/xsir.vul
http://estragon.uchicago.edu/Bibles/
http://www.hti.umich.edu/relig/rheims/
http://etext.virginia.edu/rsv.browse.html
http://ixoye.subzero.com/Classics/Vulgate/
http://nicanor.acu.edu/special/multi-language/

 

Schriber, Technology and Course Design Workshop, June 1998

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